De Père en Flic (2009)

source: photo from Amazon.ca

Deux raisons d’avoir choisi ce film-là: le film québeçois s’affiche rarement à l’Ontario au Canada, et Louis-José Houde est ben cute à la jaquette dvd! Although the film was probably marketed as Montréal cop vs. motorcycle gang, the war is really between baby-boomer fathers and Gen Y sons.

Project Blood Machine is run by Jacques Laroche (Michel Côté), and his son, Marc Laroche(Louis-José Houde) is the shooter of the team, which makes sense, he is logical, methodical, and analytical. However, he misses his shot being a sniper at a hideout, and his undercover cop friend, Jeff Tremblay (Hubert Proulx), is kidnapped and now held hostage. Charles Bérubé(Rémy GirardLes invasions barbares (2003);Le déclin de l’empire américain (1986)) is a hot-shot lawyer with little conscience, who represents the incarcerated motor-gang boss.

Jacques is the legendary cop on the force: macho, straight-shooter, gut-feel-hardcore-cop, un des vrai gars-là! He sees his son as wimpy, emotional, wishy-washy, and the worst of all he is weak! Marc sees Jacques as a bully, who is selfish, full of himself, and just wants his ego stroke at all times. On the other hand, Tim Bérubé (Patrick Drolet), Charles’ son, dies for his father’s attention and is also ready to suffocate him! At last resort, mom, Nathalie Bérubé(Sylvie Boucher) wants them to go to a father-son therapy retreat to patch things up! In order to save Jeff, Jacques and Marc join the retreat, so that they can listen on to Charles’ guilt-talks in his sleep (afterall, he is conscientious, but only repressed, and it manifests in dreams; what he knows stresses him out).

This is where the core of the story plays out, and all the laughs that come along. There are 4 other pairs of fathers and sons. So you can see how the differences among them can all be flushed out during this camping trip.

The ending is quite emotional, and no joke. I guess that’s why I like this film so much. Please, no Hollywood remake! it will ruin the jokes that work so well in Quèbec French: like lots of ostie, crisser, tabernac … you just can’t translate them.

WATCH!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s